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Articles

US: How much Louisiana parents struggle to balance children, careers

Andrea Gallo - The Advocate, 1 May 2017.
02-05-2017
More than 16 percent of Louisiana parents asked about their child care arrangements reported quitting their jobs because of problems finding care for their young children, while 18.5 percent of parents scaled back from working full-time to part-time at one point, according a survey presented Monday that was billed as the first-of-its-kind.
 

A reflection on Hong Kong’s parenting methods

Florence Lau - HKFP, 29 April 2017.
02-05-2017
The notorious parenting methods of Hong Kong parents, which are “helpful” in aiding their children to succeed in the Hong Kong educational system, have trained them to become numb to anything but success.
 

Parenting: are we getting a raw deal?

Rhonda Stephens - ABC News, 25 April 2017.
26-04-2017
Parents in the 70s defined their roles in a way we never have. The author worries that our kids are leaving home with more intellectual ability than we did, but without fewer life skills that will help them achieve the success and independence that we’ve enjoyed. But maybe it’s not us parents that are getting the raw end of this deal after all.
 

Why are we criminalizing behavior of children with disabilities?

Valerie Strauss - The Washington Post, 25 April 2017.
26-04-2017
If school districts are going to continue to station police officers in schools, they should heed federal guidance to adopt written policies that clearly limit officers’ roles to safety and security, not routine school discipline. We must equip our schools to positively and proactively address the behavioral needs of students with disabilities, not arrest children in need of support.
 

How child care enriches mothers, especially the sons they raise

Claire Cain Miller - The New York Times, 20 April 2017.
26-04-2017
As many American parents know, hiring care for young children during the workday is punishingly expensive, costing the typical family about a third of its income. Helping parents pay for that care would be expensive for society, too. Yet recent studies show that of any policy aimed to help struggling families, aid for high-quality care has the biggest economic payoff.
 

A bit of rough and tumble may do your child good

Alexandra Thompson - Daily Mail, 25 April 2017.
26-04-2017
‘Risky’ school playgrounds increase children’s happiness. Youngsters who spend their lunch break in areas with a bit of ‘rough and tumble’ are more likely to play with other children and less likely to complain of being bullied. Yet, from a teachers perspective, more adventurous playgrounds are linked with students being picked on.
 

Children in poorest neighborhoods most vulnerable

Ronnie Cohen - The Huffington Post, 25 April 2017.
26-04-2017
Children in America’s poorest communities have three times the risk of dying from child abuse before age 5 as children in the wealthiest neighborhoods, a new study finds.
 

The next great medical innovations that could save children

Sandee LaMotte - CNN, 24 April 2017.
25-04-2017
What medical advancements could save the lives of our children in the future? That’'s the question members of the American Academy of Pediatrics asked themselves. Their answers were published in the journal Pediatrics.
 

Positive parenting: teens, teens, teens

Andrew Thomas - The Westmoreland Gazette, 24 April 2017.
25-04-2017
Try to give your teen as much positive attention as possible, listen more than you speak, take their worries as seriously as they do (even if you think it is a minor worry), and provide the safe-haven physically and emotionally that they need.
 

When your child doesn’t get an award

Braden Bell - The Washington Post, 24 April 2017.
25-04-2017
When your child doesn’t get an award, stop a minute. Acknowledge the real disappointment, but then pause and redirect her, him, and, if needed, yourself. Don’t allow one disappointing experience to wipe out happy memories or damage relationships. In doing this, you help your child stay focused on what is most valuable and you help them (and yourself) develop resilience and emotional maturity.
 
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