GLOBAL PROJECT
EMPOWERING FAMILIES WORLDWIDE
familyperspectiveorg

GLOBAL RESEARCH PROJECT
Homepage
About IFFD
Papers
Interviews
Events
Projects
Statements
News
Articles
Studies
Videos
 
Search by topic
 
Adoption
Children
Communication
Demographics
Devices
Disorders
Divorce
Education
Equality
European Union
Euthanasia
Fertility
General
Grandparents
Holidays and leisure
Immigration
Legislation
Marriage
Maternity
Mental health
Parents
Policies
Poverty
Public health
Relations
Sexuality
Teenagers
United Nations
Violence
Work-family balance
Articles

Why don’t dads complain about parenthood?

Samantha Rodman - The Washington Post, 20 February 2015.
21-02-2015
I’m not talking about very traditional families in which dads do much less childcare than moms. I’m talking about the new regime, in which dads are extremely involved and do quite a bit of hands-on parenting. Here’s some research from 2013 that shows that the amount of time spent by men and women engaged in childcare is in fact converging, popular articles like ‘The Default Parent‘ notwithstanding.
 

Are you parenting with a narcissist?

Lambeth Hochwald - Yahoo, 19 February 2015.
21-02-2015
If you’ve ever been with a partner who can’t seem to tune into your feelings, does everything for their own ends, and requires constant admiration and attention but can’t give the same to you or your kids, you’re likely sharing your life with a narcissist, characterized as someone who lacks empathy and the capacity to love.
 

Why living in France is better for working parents

Emily Peck - The Huffington Post, 20 February 2015.
21-02-2015
Once upon a time, American women led the world when it came to working. In 1990, nearly three-quarters of women age 25-54 were employed in the U.S., ranking it near the top of the democratic countries in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development. Since then the percentage of women who work in the U.S. has hardly budged, while other countries have significantly upped their game.
 

How to raise children who choose peace

Molly Alexander Darden - The Huffington Post, 17 February 2015.
18-02-2015
When young people choose to join terrorists, we ask ourselves, “Why?” We surmise that they come from families and societies that offer them no opportunities. Or, that they choose the perceived glamor and power associated with bombing and killing, or it could be a factor much more subtle, involving how they feel about themselves and their position in society. But the media and parents can strongly influence how they respond to propaganda.
 

Do our online lives affect our children?

Alison Lee - The Washington Post, 17 February 2015.
18-02-2015
When our children grow up and go to college and/or apply for jobs, they will likely be Googled. Do we want their potential future boss to see them frolicking in the pool? Will employers think differently of them if they know he had a speech delay when he was 3? Will they be judged in any way because of their digital footprint, most of which in their young lives they had no say over?
 

What children think of the internet

Jennifer Richler - The New York Times, 16 February 2015.
17-02-2015
Figuring out the Internet isn’t an easy task for a young child, Dr. Danovitch pointed out. “The Internet has this weird property of being obviously not a human, but in many ways acting like one — selecting information, interacting with us,” she said. “What are kids making of it?” Some researchers are trying to figure it out. So far, most of the research has focused on school-age children, and has suggested that by kindergarten, children have a basic understanding of what computers are and what they are for.
 

The challenges of palliative care for children

Barbara Sadick - Wall Street Journal, 16 February 2015.
17-02-2015
Medical centers are creating teams that specialize in a more challenging task: delivering palliative care for young children. Despite a popular misconception, palliative care isn’t just about keeping patients comfortable until they die. Rather, palliative-care teams complement the usual array of physicians, specialists and clinicians, helping patients by managing pain, treating symptoms and ensuring that they have the best possible quality of life.
 

Should children get paid for chores?

Tara Parker-Pope - The New York Times, 12 February 2015.
17-02-2015
Ron Lieber, the New York Times personal finance columnist and author of the new book ‘The Opposite of Spoiled,’ argues that because parents don’t get paid for family housework, neither should the kids. Even so, Mr. Lieber says he believes an allowance is an essential teaching tool for raising children. Giving your children a reasonable amount of money to manage allows them to learn about the need to make trade-offs and the difference between wants and needs, and it puts them on a path for making “spectacular mistakes.”
 

All children should receive ‘happiness’ lessons

Laura Donnelly - The Telegraph, 14 February 2015.
15-02-2015
Children of all ages should be given an hour’s “happiness lessons” every week to nurture their development and stop schools behaving as “exams factories,” a major report will warn this week. Former ministers and Government advisors are calling for radical changes in the way British pupils are brought up, with accusations of a “grossly inhumane” failure to care for children’s wellbeing.
 

Why do so many millennials live with their parents?

Jordan Weissmann - Slate, 10 February 2015.
15-02-2015
Last year, even as the job market picked up speed, the fraction of 25-to-34-year-old Americans living with their parents stayed stuck at record highs nearing 15 percent. In the past several months, a handful of studies have suggested that the reasons grown children are returning to the nest in greater numbers than ever may have less to do with the rise and fall of the unemployment rate, and more to do with lasting changes to young adult life, such as the growth of student debt and delayed marriage.
 
< PreviousNext >
 
 
Most popular

Articles

101 reasons to be optimistic about parenting today


Studies

Redesigning the workplace of the future


Videos

Nobody should be left alone

 
 
Last Paper

An adequate environment for everyone

[November 2019]
 
If you would like to receive regular updates via email, please provide us with the following information.
 
Name

 
Email

 
 
Facebook    Twitter    Twitter

Mobile version
 
This site is managed by the International Federation for Family Development and aims to offer all stakeholders background documentation and updated information.
The contents do not represent the official position of any institution, but only the views of its author and they are provided under the terms of a Creative Commons Public License Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported. If you would like to suggest some other document, event or link, or make any comment, please contact the webmaster.