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People in the EU: who are we and how do we live?

Eurostat, November 2015.
10-12-2015
This study draws on the results of the population and housing census that was conducted across the Member States of the European Union and the countries of the European Free trade Association. In addition, the publication presents a wide range of official social statistics in order to paint a detailed picture of the population, households and housing.
 

Violence against women in the EU - State of play

European Parliament, November 2015.
30-11-2015
Update of the briefing on the occassion of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women. It shows that although there are similarities between national policies to combat violence against women, the Member States have adopted different approaches to the problem.
 

How bad policies raise the cost for families

Salim Furth - Heritage Foundation, 23 November 2015.
27-11-2015
Citizens pay for the mistakes made by government, and it adds up to hundreds of billions of dollars a year. In this report, a research fellow in Heritage’s Center for Data Analysis, examines a dozen policies that impose readily quantifiable costs on the vast majority of American consumers, yet produce few broadly-shared benefits.
 

What Americans really think about marriage

Deseret News and Center for the Study of Elections and Democracy, November 2015.
19-11-2015
The American Family Survey is a new, nationwide poll from the Deseret News and the Center for the Study of Elections and Democracy. It studies how Americans think about marriage and parenting, their family lives, and their opinions about the most important issues affecting families today.
 

Will the refugee surge affect the European economy?

OECD, November 2015.
18-11-2015
This edition of Migration Policy Debates provides an assessment of the possible economic impact of the refugee crisis in Europe. It stresses that while there will obviously be short-term costs arising from such large flows, there will also be sizeable economic and public-finance benefits, provided that refugees are integrated into the labour market.
 

The Evolving Role of Marriage: 1950–2010

Shelly Lundberg and Robert A. Pollak - The Future of Children, November 2015.
13-11-2015
Since 1950, marriage behavior in the United States has changed dramatically. We’ve seen a retreat from marriage within all racial and ethnic groups and across the socioeconomic spectrum. But the decoupling of marriage and parenthood has been much less prevalent among college graduates. Why are college graduates such a prominent exception?
 

How working parents share the load

Pew Research Center, 4 November 2015.
09-11-2015
This survey, conducted among 1,807 U.S. parents with children younger than 18, shows that in two-parent families, parenting and household responsibilities pose challenges for parents. In fact, more than half (56%) of all working parents say this balancing act is difficult. Among working mothers, in particular, 41% report that being a parent has made it harder for them to advance in their career; about half that share of working fathers (20%) say the same.
 

Government initiatives for work-family balance

Jennifer Baxter and Jennifer Renda - Australian Institute of Family Studies, August 2015.
02-11-2015
This research report presents a review of government initiatives that help families balance their work and family responsibilities, highlighting innovative ideas and including a discussion of international trends and themes.
 

Strong families, prosperous states

W. Bradford Wilcox, PRobert I. Lerman,Joseph Price - American Enterprise Institute and the Institute for Family Studies, 19 October 2015.
26-10-2015
Economics has its roots in the Greek word oikonomia, which means the “management of the household.” Yet economists across the ideological spectrum have paid little attention to the links between household family structure and the macroeconomic outcomes of nations, states, and societies. This is a major oversight because, as this report shows, shifts in marriage and family structure are important factors in states’ economic performance.
 

Single-parent family poverty in 24 OECD countries

Luxembourg Income Study Center, 19 October 2015
24-10-2015
Single-parent families and their high poverty rates remain a genuine concern in OECD countries. Much of the research has focused on “redistribution” through income taxes and transfers as an effective strategy to reduce poverty. The study adopts this traditional approach, and then push forward a focus on “market” strategies that facilitate single parents’ labor market participation.
 
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