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98 results for “Maternity” [from 01-01-2014 to 07-12-2019] - Page 2/4
 
Articles
26 Parenting the kids — and the parents
Bridgette Brossette - The Shreveport Times, 30 August 2015. [31-08-2015]
When the physical or mental health of a parent starts to fail, it’s a natural instinct to want to come to the rescue. After all, your parents have cared for you during the course of your life. Being a caregiver for your parent and being a mother yourself considerably burdens your time, energy, health, and finances. It also can put a strain on your marriage and relationships with your children.
27 Parenting remains primarily women's work
Glosswitch - New Statesman, 27 August 2015. [27-08-2015]
We need more mothers in literature, not just to make it more inclusive, but because our perception of motherhood remains so badly skewed. Speaking at the Edinburgh International Book Festival last weekend, the writer Janice Galloway argued that “literature is mostly about having sex and not much about having children. Life is the other way round.”
28 Mothers' time invested in children does matter
Jenet Erickson - Deseret News, 23 August 2015. [25-08-2015]
Every mother’s natural yearnings to be there, to nurture, to protect should never be discounted. In repeated surveys, nearly half of mothers working full-time say they would rather not. And of married mothers with at least one child under the age of 17, only 23 percent said full-time employment would be their ideal work situation.
29 Mothers are often the caregiver when a child is sick
Phys, 18 August 2015. [19-08-2015]
Mothers give more than they receive when family struck by major illness, and that motherly instinct doesn't go away when the child is an adult. In fact, mothers provide more support to adult children with a serious health condition than to their other children, according to new research that will be presented at the American Sociological Association 2015 Annual Meeting.
30 Breastfeeding as an essential parenting choice
Hiba Masood- Dawn, 6 August 2015. [07-08-2015]
Breastfeeding is hard. And it is easy. It is complicated and utterly simple. It is terrifying and exhausting and yet, exhilarating. But most of all, it is always worth it. Just like parenting. Just like life.
31 What do adult children of single parents say?
Angel Soft - The Huffington Post, 3 August 2015. [03-08-2015]
All parents make sacrifices. But single parents? Those raising children on their own, without a partner? They do it all. The sacrifices they make are often so extraordinary that it’s hard for the rest of us to sometimes comprehend how they do it. And adults raised by single parents express their deepest gratitude to them.
32 Airports get friendly for parents with young children
Shivani Vora - The New York Times, 30 July 2015. [31-07-2015]
Airports are getting a little more child-friendly, at least for parents traveling with babies and toddlers in US. The Honest Company, a consumer goods brand, recently started installing automated kiosks stocked with essentials for parents who forgot to bring diapers onto their next flight. The eco-friendly line, founded by the actress Jessica Alba in 2012, has set up nine kiosks at several airports and already plans more.
33 Understanding the Greece crisis in family terms
Sara Zervo - The World Post, 11 July 2015. [13-07-2015]
Our family dynamics can give insight into the dilemmas the various constituents face within the European situation as pertaining to Greece. There’s always one black sheep in the family. In the author’s case, that sheep is her sister. After decades of family support to her, family’s patience has undoubtedly worn thin.
34 US: family stability in red and blue states
Mandy Morgan - Deseret News, 6 July 2015. [07-07-2015]
Race and ethnicity are significant factors in measuring family stability, but family stability within racial groups varied depending on the partisan political ideologies where they lived, researchers have found. This new research, from W. Bradford Wilcox and Nicholas Zill and released by Family Studies, came after other data found that “the reddest and bluest states in America are most likely to provide today's teens with the kind of stable, married family life that fosters optimal child outcomes.”
35 Prison born
Sarah Yager - The Atlantic, July/August 2015. [24-06-2015]
Over the past four decades, as the inmate population in the United States has grown into the largest in the world, the number of children with a parent in custody has risen to nearly 3 million. For corrections officials and policy makers, those relationships can fade into the background. But not when a child is born on the inside. Research suggests that having nurseries in prisons leads to lower recidivism rates for moms and better outcomes for their kids.
36 Applying startup lessons to family life
Chris Myers - Forbes, 21 May 2015. [22-05-2015]
Creating a business from scratch is one of the most difficult tasks anyone can undertake, and nurturing that creation to maturity requires an obsessive level of time and attention. The thought of taking on such a challenge while shouldering the responsibility of raising a young family seems like an impossible task, but it can be done. It turns out that startup and family life aren’t that different after all.
37 Communicating the family
Joseph Mizzi - Times of Malta, 16 May 2015. [16-05-2015]
A tree without roots is a dead tree and a person without the family is a person without life. No one can live without the family. Everybody needs a family because the family is the right environment where to love and be loved, to live, to grow, to mature and to retire. On the occasion of the International Day of the Family, we have to communicate again to everybody what the real meaning of the family is.
38 Some of the best quotes on motherhood
Debbie M. Lord - AL, 9 May 2015. [10-05-2015]
It’s safe to say we have all had our share of quotes delivered from our mothers. The topics range from clean rooms, to clean plates, to clean underwear. But what some quotes about our mothers? If you’re looking for a clever quip to put into your Mother's Day card, one that will make mom think you have spent days trying to coming up with just the right verbal bouquet, we have a few suggestions for you.
39 Surviving mother's day as a non-Mom (not by choice)
Holly R. Cashman - The Huffington Post, 9 May 2015. [10-05-2015]
For non-moms-not-by-choice, for people who have lost their moms, people whose maternal relationship was abusive or otherwise problematic, or moms who have lost children, Mother's Day can be an incredibly hard time. Triggers are everywhere, and the holiday's apparent universality has a very alienating effect.
40 Hundreds of children brain damaged by their mums
Nicola Fifield - Mirror, 25 April 2015. [26-04-2015]
Hundreds of children were hospitalised last year after being born brain damaged because their mothers boozed while pregnant. There were 272 hospital admissions of youngsters left disabled by Foetal Alcohol Syndrome, figures from the official Health and Social Care Information Centre show. Experts believe this number, from England alone in the past 12 months, is the tip of the iceberg of undiagnosed cases.
41 Mother's support is vital for sexually abused children
Fox News, 16 March 2015. [27-03-2015]
Sexually abused children whose mothers believe them and offer comfort are less likely to suffer from anger and depression, according to a recent study. “Disclosing sexual abuse can be a very stressful process for a child, and the reactions of the child’s primary caregiver can play a key role in the child’s adjustment,” said lead author Kristyn Zajac, an assistant professor at the Family Services Research Center at the Medical University of South Carolina.
42 Minding the nurture gap
The Economist, 21 March 2015. [20-03-2015]
The most important divide in America today is class, not race, and the place where it matters most is in the home. Conservatives have been banging on about family breakdown for decades. Now one of the nation’s most prominent liberal scholars has joined the chorus. In his new book, Robert Putnam describes the growing gulf between how the rich and the poor raise their children.
43 Unspoken fantasies of moms of young kids
Samantha Rodman -The Washington Post, 5 March 2015. [06-03-2015]
Sometimes, as a mom, you just stare into space and think. And every so often, you’re not musing about how you could afford a biweekly cleaning service if you just stopped shopping compulsively on Zulily. You’re descending into one of these mom fantasies, that everyone has but nobody discusses aloud…. Until now.
44 What marriage really means
Dennis S. Lerner - The Huffington Post, 26 February 2015. [27-02-2015]
Back in our parents' and grandparents' day, the world, and our descriptions of it were pretty much, this or that. People were male or female, single or married, working or looking. For every trend, however, there is a counter-trend. In this case the counter-trend is toward the loss of specific meaning. Vocabularies are being simplified and distinctions being lost. At the extreme, thousands of years of language development are being erased as language is reduced to glyphs displayed on smartphones rather than cave walls.
45 How this mother of seven does it
Rebekah Curtis - The Federalist, 25 February 2015. [26-02-2015]
Here’s the author’s response to the ever-present implied rhetorical non-question about how to mother seven children. “I still have my hands full, and kids do grow up fast, even if people don’t tell me those things any more. I wonder if young mothers would be badgered by strangers with that latter insight so often if more people had more kids.”
46 The global flight from the family
Nicholas Eberstadt - The Wall Street Journal, 21 February 2015. [21-02-2015]
All around the world today, pre-existing family patterns are being upended by a revolutionary new force: the seemingly unstoppable quest for convenience by adults demanding ever-greater autonomy. We can think of this as another triumph of consumer sovereignty, which has at last brought rational choice and elective affinities into a bastion heretofore governed by traditions and duties—many of them onerous. Thanks to this revolution, it is perhaps easier than ever before to free oneself from the burdens that would otherwise be imposed by spouses, children, relatives or significant others with whom one shares a hearth. Yet in infancy and childhood and then again much later, in feebleness or senescence, people need more from others.
47 Children prefer mothers who respect their autonomy
Janice Wood - Psych Central, 31 January 2015. [01-02-2015]
A new study shows that respect for autonomy is important, not only for children’s growth, but also for creating positive parent-child relationships. We found that mothers who supported their children’s autonomy were regarded more positively by their children than mothers who were highly directive.
48 5 questions from a newer mom
Audra Rundle - The Huffington Post, 26 January 2015. [27-01-2015]
“It took having kids for me to understand just how challenging and intricate parenting really is. It takes an entire childhood for parents to really get educated about their role, but by then, of course, the child is grown and moves out. What a cruel joke Mother Nature plays on us! So, as a newer mom with only three years of experience, I have a few questions for you older moms with grown children who finally know what you're doing.”
49 Next generation holds the key to family giving
Steven Crandell - The Huffington Post, 9 January 2015. [10-01-2015]
Some people look to philanthropy to provide the glue for a dysfunctional family. But without effort by family members, even the most carefully laid out giving program can run into problems. In some cases, family giving can become a place for airing old resentments, and a project designed to bring the family together can do just the opposite.
50 A letter to my children whom I never wanted
Toni Hammer - The Huffington Post, 5 January 2015. [06-01-2015]
The author never wanted kids and she started off her journey to motherhood without a map. But then it turned out that they have given her a greater purpose to get up every morning than any other job could ever give. And the most important lesson, they have taught her to love herself.
 
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